Final Voyages 56 results

Providing No More

“It was totally bizarre.” That was the way veteran Canso fisherman Billy Bond described it. And, his sentiments, more or less, sum up the feelings of the fishermen and most other people in Canso, Nova Scotia, when talking about the loss of the Fisherman’s Provider II and especially the death of the vessel’s captain, Roger Stoddard. Owned by Fishermen’s Market International Inc., the 43-foot fibreglass fishing vessel was docked at the company’s wharf in Canso, located on the ...

It Must Have Been Really Quick – Part II

After refitting his longliner in the winter of 1994/95, Skipper Bob Stacey from St. Lawrence had a brand-new boat ready for the 1995 fishing season on the south coast of Newfoundland. The Jessie Marie was even five feet longer than before the refit. One of the main reasons for the upgrade was to make the vessel suitable for scallop fishing. Bob and his two-man crew fished the Jessie Marie for several months after the refit and for the most part, things went fairly well, but during a ...

It Must Have Been Really Quick

Bob Stacey was known as a hard-working fisherman. With little interest in anything else except hunting, the young fishing skipper from St. Lawrence, on the southern tip of Newfoundland’s Burin Peninsula, worked tirelessly in his chosen profession. If he wasn’t at sea, he was working on his boat and fishing gear. Bob was a St. Lawrence oddity in some respects. St. Lawrence bills itself as the Soccer Capital of Canada and it has good reason to make that claim. Its team, St. Lawrence ...

Third Time Unlucky – Part II

Boat repairs created problems for fishing skipper Kenneth Hickey in 2015. His 45-foot vessel DSL Enterprises needed upgrading, but the work was taking longer than anticipated and by mid-June, Kenneth was worried whether he’d be able to catch his snow crab quota before the season ended in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland at the end of June. His wife Madeline was the registered owner of a second enterprise that included a 45-foot vessel, but government rules prevented Kenneth from using the second ...

Third Time Unlucky

Kenneth Hickey was known as a cautious fisherman. His wife Madeline says her husband often worried about many of his peers because he felt they were not exercising safe fishing practices. She says he often voiced his thoughts on the matter and that is why she never worried about Kenneth when he was at sea. Kenneth, from Southern Harbour, Newfoundland, was generally attentive and careful in almost everything he did, but in a period of a year or so he had a couple of close calls that ...

Pop’s Pride – Part III

On September 6, 2016, the 22-foot fishing boat Pop’s Pride left port in St. John’s Newfoundland between 6:30 a.m. and 7 a.m. with four fishermen onboard. Three of the men were from a single family. The fourth was a family friend. All were from Shea Heights, a tight-knit community within the city limits of St. John’s. As the men hauled their nets that morning, winds increased to approximately 30-32 knots (56-60 kilometres per hour) along with seas of two metres (six feet). It appears the ...

Pop’s Pride – Part II

Three members of one fishing family, along with a family friend, all from Shea Heights-St. John’s, N.L., went fishing on September 6, 2016 in a 22-foot open boat. When Eugene Walsh, his son Keith and Keith’s son, Keith Jr., along with Billy Humby, had not returned by early afternoon, family members and friends became concerned. Winds had increased to 25–30 knots and waves reached six feet high outside the St. John’s Narrows — not good conditions for a small boat. This is Part II of ...

Pop’s Pride

Sonya Walsh didn’t hear her husband Keith get up on Tuesday morning, September 6, 2016. Neither did she hear the alarm clock that always woke Keith. She didn’t hear her husband and their son Keith Jr., age 18, having breakfast and chatting before they left the house at approximately 5 a.m. to go fishing. Ordinarily, 36-year old Sonya would have merely dismissed her deep sleep that morning as nothing more than extreme tiredness, but events later that day makes her wonder about some ...

Survivor Extreme – Part V

After surviving a brutal trek over a mountain through snow and ice, a partially frozen river and ice-covered rocks in bare feet, Dave Barnes eventually made it to the relative comfort of a small cabin located on Ten-Mile Bay, south of Nain, Labrador. For a while, it seemed the remainder of his journey home would be in relative comfort compared to what he suffered in the previous nine hours. But comfort would prove to be elusive. This is Part V of “Survivor Extreme” The cabin on Ten Mile ...

Survivor Extreme – Part IV

Following the sinking of the tug Sea Alert just south of Nain Labrador in the fall of 1995, Dave Barnes faced what most would find insurmountable odds to survive. After swimming a mile in freezing water, he managed to make it to land but a mountain lay between him and safety. He climbed the snow-covered mountain in bare feet and finally made it to a small shack on the Labrador coastline. But surviving the night would be a major struggle. This is Part IV of Survivor Extreme.   F...