month : 02/2016 38 results

Competitiveness — Part III

Last month, I discussed how to measure the competitiveness of our industry. I concluded by suggesting four key measures: Where and when can we sell our products? How do the prices we receive compare with the prices received by competitors? How do incomes compare to those of competitors? How does our return on investment compare with that earned by competitors? This month, I will discuss how our industry performs against these measures. Before I get to the heart of the ...

Climate Change Hits the Seafood Industry; We’re in for a Wild Ride

As I write this in Boston on December 23, highs are forecast in the 70s. It is not just that we haven’t seen snow. The same thing is true in New Hampshire and Maine, hundreds of miles to the north. The unsettling warmth is not just disrupting holiday ambiance. My wife had wanted to get sleds for our grandchildren this year and I felt what was the point since they couldn’t use them. It is also disrupting the seafood industry on a global scale. Our basic problem is that warming ...

Record Lobster Landings and Price but Quality an Issue in LFA 33-34

If there was ever a time that lobstermen in LFA 33-34 would get a decent opening day price for their catch, it is now. It was sort of a perfect storm in regards to price —few lobsters on the market, a low Canadian dollar, a demand for the product in Asia and northern Europe, as well as the all-important U.S. market and a weather forecast generally void of gale force winds. Lobsters opened at $6-$6.25/pound and were still at that level when January arrived. Landings have been phenom...

Solving the Mystery: Origin and Stock Structure of Capelin in the Northwest Atlantic and the Arctic

Capelin is an important forage (or food) species for several fish, mammal and seabird species in the ocean environment and is therefore considered a keystone species for maintaining marine ecosystems. The species also plays an important role in supporting commercially valuable fisheries as well as a small capelin commercial fishery. However, for decades, capelin have puzzled scientists because so little has been known about the structure of the stock over its entire range distribution. ...

A Call to Action: P.E.I. Groups Join National Call to Improve Rights for Temporary Foreign Workers

The thought of being legally tied to an employer is borderline laughable for the average Canadian. Citizens and residents of Canada are free to quit and take jobs as easily as switching hats — if they can get them. But not everyone living in our society is so fortunate. People working in this country under the federal temporary foreign worker program, and its various sub-programs, are largely tied to the employer to whom they are hired and approved to work for under the program. If, ...

A People Person

Most people who know Mildred Skinner from Harbour Breton, located on Newfoundland’s south coast, would agree with her self-assessment that she is a people person. Now in her 50s, Mildred has been volunteering since she was a teenager. After a few different jobs as a young woman, including a stint in the retail business, a cook, waitress and Canada Post employee, Mildred later became a full-time fisherwoman which in turn led to related volunteer positions such as an inshore council ...

Mega Projects May Not Be the Only Way to Go

Pictured above: Location of Ann's Bank off Cape Breton Every coastal community in Atlantic Canada has seen the brain and brawn drain of our younger generation in the past decade or so, brought on by the lack of economic opportunities down here compared to the streets of gold in the Alberta oil patch. How things have changed. We now have an exodus of our young people returning to the fatherland due to the collapse of the oil and gas industry — due in large part to the actions of ...

Dick Stewart Calling it Quits After 76 Years in the Fishery

Even though he was born in Ottawa 84 years ago, salt water has never been far from Dick Stewart’s mind or veins, as he reminisced about the commercial fisheries he has been a part of in one way or another for seven decades. “My father was from Nova Scotia but my mother was American. We moved to the Lockeport area of Nova Scotia in the 1940s and that’s when my brother and I bought a lobster fishing license. I was 12 years old,” he said. “I well remember that we received 20 cents ...