month : 01/2017 22 results

Twine Loft – January 2017

Passed On: Robert Truckair – Glace Bay, N.S. Fisherman Truckair passed away November 16 at the Glace Bay Hospital with loving family at his side. Born in Glace Bay he was the son of Lambert and Elsie (MacLeod) Truckair. Truckair was a self-employed boat captain/fisherman, fishing all over the coasts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. He was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 3 and the Glace Bay Harbour Authority. He started fishing on his own at the age of 16, where he fished lobster ...

Eelgrass Nursery School for Juvenile Cod

As a child growing up beside the sea in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Bob Gregory spent a lot of time in tide pools with his friends. They would jump and splash through strands of green plants they’d call grass or weeds. “My mother jokes that when I was a little kid, I used to say I wanted to be a nature scientist. In grade one, I couldn’t spell ‘nature scientist,’ when I was asked what I wanted to be when I grew up. She told me that I wrote down, ‘milkman,’ simply because I could ...

No Friend of Poachers

Larry Rumbolt can’t remember when he started fishing, but clearly remembers when he became a full-fledged crewmember and was paid a share of the season’s catch of cod and salmon. The year was 1979 and Larry was 10 years old. His skipper was his dad, Charl (Charles) Rumbolt and his other boat mate was his 12-year-old brother Carlton. The fishing season in Mary’s Harbour, Labrador was perfectly timed for schoolboys like Larry. Cod and salmon migrated to inshore coastal waters in late ...

2016: Predicting the Unpredictable

Many industry prognosticators have claimed the Atlantic Canadian fishery each year has become rather predictable. It has been said that, depending on the particular month of the year, predicting a particular issue or crisis in the fishery has become almost like clockwork — and in the past, there might have been some truth in that conjecture. But that theory did not exactly hold water in 2016. The last 12 months were filled with enough twists, turns and surprises to keep many a wannabe ...

Groundfish Council Influencing Changes to N.L. Cod Fishery

The Newfoundland and Labrador Groundfish Industry Development Council (GIDC) has only been in existence for 10 months, but has already made an impact on the province’s fishery. In April 2016, the union representing fishermen and plant workers (Fish Food and Allied Workers – FFAW) announced it had teamed up with some of the province’s fish processors to form the GIDC, with the goal of facilitating inter-industry cooperation in the revitalization of the groundfish industry. The ...

New Entrants to Fishery Need to Meet Exact DFO Criteria

Acquiring a fishing license used to be as easy as walking up to your local DFO office and springing a few bucks and voila, you could legally prosecute this fishery. There were a lot of loopholes with this scenario, chief of which was that non-fishermen would take their vacations during the opening weeks of the lobster fishing season in LFA 34, for example, acquire a license and reap the benefits then go back to their day jobs. This policy was finally changed, limiting the licenses to ...

Sustaining Fisheries

GAMS Holds Successful Two-Day Industry Forum The fifth annual Fishermen’s Forum, “Sustaining Fisheries: Challenges and Changes” took place at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, on November 21-22. The Fishermen’s Forum is organized by The Gulf Aquarium and Marine Station (GAMS). The Forum is a free event, open to all members of the local fishing associations, fishing and aquaculture industries, government and academic scientists, NGO’s and the public and other stakehold...

Group’s Spirits Raised on Shipwreck Issue

Coast Guard Recommends Manolis L Oil Removal Following Technical Assessment The shipwrecked tanker Manolis L has given up its innermost secrets after lying on the sea bottom in Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland, for 36 years. Armed with knowledge of how much oil remains in the wreck’s cargo tanks following a detailed technical assessment, the Canadian Coast Guard is recommending to the federal government that potential environment-damaging oil be removed from the wreck as soon as the operation ...

Valuable and Lucrative LFA 33-34 Season Kicks Off

Nor’easters are not a fishermen’s friend, especially on dumping day of the lobster fishery. One was predicted to visit the weekend leading up to November 28, the day when over 1,600 lobstermen from Eastern Passage, Halifax County, to Digby, Nova Scotia, were due to set over half a million lobster pots to usher the beginning of the winter season in LFA 33-34. The storm veered more to the north than predicted and most of the key lobster sites in the areas were spared near hurricane ...

Learning from 40 Years with the 200-Mile Limit – Part II

Last month’s column dealt mainly with how Canada obtained the 200-mile limit in 1977, leading to great optimism about the future of the fishery in Atlantic Canada, but things did not turn out as expected. Starting in 1992, just 15 years later, we imposed a series of moratoriums on fishing groundfish stocks to try to conserve what was left of those resources. However, things were not going well even before the moratoriums. In 1981, there was a Royal Commission to investigate problems in ...