Column 185 results

Why Do We Process Fish?

A couple of months ago, I asked the question, “how should we define success in the fishery in Atlantic Canada?” I went on to suggest we need to reconsider what it takes to be successful, because what we have been doing hasn’t been working. Last month, I continued with that overall theme by asking the related question, “why do we fish?” This month, I will go to the next step in the value chain and ask, “why do we process fish?” When your day job is catching fish, it is ...

Collaboration in the North

Sharing Knowledge About Species and Culture It’s not everyday that researchers get to learn as much as they teach. On a recent trip to the Labrador coast, two young biologists from Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) were on a mission to tag Arctic char and look for invasive species and they came back with something much more: An appreciation of how Inuit live off the land. Team members Sheena Roul and Jennica Seiden had been to Labrador before, but this was their first time ...

Combining Fishfinders with Underwater Cameras: The Future of Scientific Surveys?

“What is that red spot on the screen?” This is a question that every mariner and fishery scientist using fishfinders has been asked. While experience and knowledge of the ecosystem help provide some clues, we cannot be certain without further identifications. Fisheries scientists use scientific echosounders, also known as fishfinders, to survey the distribution and abundance of fish throughout the world. It is important to know exactly what species are detected by the echosounders and ...

Using Underwater Light in Commercial Fishing Applications

Fishing with artificial lights is one of the most advanced and successful methods to increase catch rates in recreational and commercial fishing operations. It has a well-documented history in many parts of the world, including Africa, China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Peru, Russia, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam. Historically, it started with simple techniques such as burning a large bonfire on the beach to attract fish. Fishermen and their family members ...

Going Underwater in Placentia Bay

Restoring an Ecosystem From the Bottom Up It was more than 400 years ago that Placentia Bay’s fishing industry started. Back then, Placentia’s large, rocky beach meant that fish could be salted and dried right on the rocks rather than on a constructed wooden fishing stage, saving time and effort. Placentia’s economy was based on the cod fishery and cod trade. In fact, the fisheries of Placentia played a large role in securing Newfoundland as the world’s largest exporter of ...

Why Do We Fish?

In last month’s column, I asked the question, how should we define success in the fishery in Atlantic Canada?” I went on to suggest we need to reconsider what it takes to be successful, because what we have been doing hasn’t been working. This month, I will continue with that overall theme, by asking the related question, “why do we fish?” Maybe the answer seems obvious — we fish to catch fish, the more the better. But that is neither the right answer nor a good one. Fishing ...

A Changing Tide for the Golden Cod of Gilbert Bay

Scientists Proposing New Initiatives to Help Save the Unique Fish Dr. Corey Morris would rather spend his vacations on the coast of Labrador than Florida. For 21 years, Morris has been to Gilbert Bay three times a year for weeks at a time, working on conserving the famous Gilbert Bay cod, known for its golden colour. Geographically, the area around Gilbert Bay is a coastal fiord in Southern Labrador, isolated from the coast by a bunch of islands. It covers 60 square kilometers. ...

Survivor Extreme – Part III

On Wednesday, November 1, 1995, an 85-foot tug struck a rocky shoal about 10 miles south of Nain, Labrador. The Sea Alert sank within 10-12 minutes. The captain and two other crewmembers were lost with the vessel. The engineer, 30-year old Dave Barnes made it off the boat, but his journey to survival defies logic and some would say also defies medical science. This is the continuation of Survivor Extreme.   After two agonizing hours swimming and paddling a wooden crate-like raft ...

How Should We Define Success?

How should we define success in the fishery in Atlantic Canada? It is an important question, because how we define success determines what we do to achieve it. Essentially, there are four dimensions to having a successful industry. First, we sell practically all our output in markets outside Canada, where we must compete with similar products supplied by others. Our competitiveness in those markets determines how successful we are likely to be. Unfortunately, competitiveness is not ...

On the Waterfront – October 2018

Clearwater Permitted to Fish 100 Per Cent of Arctic Surf Clam Quota The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) confirmed Sept. 11 that the remaining 25 per cent of the 2018 and 2019 Arctic surf clam total allowable catch (TAC) will be made available to the current licence holder, Clearwater, with a view to identify a new participant for the 2020 fishery. DFO said this decision will allow for the economic benefits to remain in coastal communities while it continues to work to broaden ...