Column 110 results

Training and Support for Women in Fisheries Science at the Marine Institute

By Susan Fudge, Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research The Fisheries and Marine Institute (MI) of Memorial University is known around the globe for its world-class training in fisheries, ocean technology, marine safety, marine transportation and beyond. Over the past decade, the Institute has been gaining recognition for its applied fisheries research. Fisheries in the Northwest Atlantic are a scientist’s dream to study. From the complex ecosystem, varying oceanographic influences, ...

Are Coastal Communities in Peril?

Atlantic Ocean Predicted to Rise Substantially in 20- 50 Years While President Trump contemplates a mega billion-dollar wall between the U.S.-Mexican border, recent news from the scientific community strongly indicates the wall should be constructed along the coastline of the United States to protect such entities as New York City, Miami and San Francisco. The accepted theory by most of the world’s leading marine scientists is that the world oceans would rise by one to two feet in the ...

You Say Crustacean, I Say Lobster

Oh, that lobster. Besides tasting great with a bit of butter, they’re very interesting. To some people, they look like a huge insect. In fact, they’ve been called the cockroach of the sea. And — get this — they taste with their legs and chew with their stomachs. They can walk backwards or forwards. Really, they should work with Cirque du Soleil. They seem to keep growing and growing and growing, too. The largest lobster ever caught was in Nova Scotia in 1977 and weighed ...

Serving Customers – Part II

Last month, my column was about the array of cod products — and products of some other species often substituted for cod – available for different prices at retail stores in St. John’s, N.L. Stores in larger cities undoubtedly offer an even broader range of fish products and prices. And, of course, fish competes with other protein foods, such as beef, pork and poultry. Given the array of choices offered to them, I asked, how do consumers decide which products to buy, take home and ...

Sea Vegetables, Seaweed Pie and Opportunities in Canada

Marine macroalgae or “seaweeds” are found in products used daily by Canadians and around the world. Toothpaste, for example, often contains a gelling agent extracted from seaweed (e.g. guar gum) that gives it its smooth consistency and keeps the cleaning components of the paste well dispersed and stabilized. A seaweed extract (e.g. alginate) also keeps the lemon filling in meringue pies smooth and firm. In general, seaweeds are considered a “superfood” and have numerous uses that are ...

The Bluenose and the Cape Islander: Two Different Fishing Vessels, Two Different Stories

Nova Scotia will have the honour of having two of its fishing vessels featured on Canadian currency when the Cape Islander will be part of a commemorative Loonie celebrating this country’s 150th anniversary. The first one was the Bluenose, which first graced the Canadian dime in 1937. Two different boats, two different tales. The Bluenose was built in Lunenburg, N.S., to fish and race against its counterparts in Gloucester, Mass., in the 1920s. The schooner design had actually ...

Serving Customers

In the fishery in Atlantic Canada, there is a widespread belief among harvesters that they are the most important people in the seafood value chain, because they catch fish for others to process and eat. Without them, there would be no fish. Although there is a certain logic to it, that view of the world is completely upside down. In any value chain — seafood or other — the most important person is the one at the end of the chain — the consumer — who buys the product, pays for it, ...

Dark Seas, Bright Lights, Snow Crab and Lights

Know how to make a snow crab do what you want? Remember, they’re sweet and delicate and not to be pushed around. Dr. Corey Morris, a research scientist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, knows how important snow crab is as a fishery in this province. Morris, from St. Anthony, has always had an interest in fishing. “I guess I’m steeped in the culture of fishing and in using the resources around us,” says Morris. One of his interests is studying effects of man-made stressors on ...

Shaping the World We Live in

The beginning of a new year seems to be a good time to think about what the future will bring. Little did we think at the beginning of 2016 that now, just a year later, Donald Trump would be President of the United States, Britain would vote to leave the European Union, or the very existence of the EU would be under threat just as Canada is about to finalize a free-trade agreement with it. Life seems to be full of surprises. But should they really be surprises? Over Christmas, I read a ...

New Equipment Strengthens Capabilities at MI’s Marine Bioprocessing Facility

Two new pieces of equipment at the Fisheries and Marine Institute’s (MI) Centre for Aquaculture and Seafood Development (CASD) are allowing the team to extract valuable by-products from fisheries and aquaculture waste on a much larger scale. Going forward, a new processing line, consisting of a Scraped Surface Heat Exchanger and 3-Phase Decanter Centrifuge will separate fish waste into the components of oil, water, protein and bone at commercial volume. Equipment Advances “This is the ...