Column 224 results

Increasing Income and Profitability in the Fishery

A value chain is the sequence of activities that ultimately delivers products and/or services to the final consumer. In the capture fishery, for example, harvesters catch fish and sell them to processors, who turn them into a range of products and sell them to buyers, who may process them further or distribute them through retail stores, restaurants, or other channels to the consumers who eat the products. The prices paid by the consumers at the end of the chain determine the overall ...

Exploratory Fisheries and Ecosystem Surveys in Nunavut

Exploratory marine fisheries in Nunavut represent potential new opportunities for economic development and have recently been extended thanks to an industry-academic partnership which will provide new insights about the marine ecosystems that support Arctic food webs and fisheries yields. In 2014, the Arctic Fishery Alliance (AFA) and the Marine Institute’s Centre for Fisheries Ecosystems Research (CFER) undertook a mission to Nunavut to explore potential new fisheries and collect valuable ...

Aquaculture and Lobster; Two Reports, Different Responses

You’d think the discussion of a topic which could have a direct impact on your income down the road would garner a fair bit of response. What I’m referring to is the release a few months ago of the generic marketing plan for Canadian lobster, which would be funded by a levy at the first point of sale. The plan has been endorsed by lobstermen in P.E.I., parts of New Brunswick and the northern and eastern sections of Nova Scotia. The tri-county area of Digby-Yarmouth-Shelburne in ...

Abandon Ship: Tips on Surviving in Cold Water

In our previous articles we’ve discussed some of the things you can do if you find yourself in an emergency situation on the water. Let’s say you’ve done everything right so far: you’ve told someone your voyage plan before you left dock; registered and triggered your Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB); shot off a flare; called in a Mayday giving your location, the number of people on board and the nature of the emergency and put on your safety gear, providing both ...

Safety Culture Catching on in Nova Scotia Fishery

Various governmental agencies in Nova Scotia have been pushing the safety at sea issue for fishermen for quite some time — and their efforts seem to be paying off, in a big way. While the commercial fishery remains the most dangerous occupation in Canada and each year claims far too many lives and limbs, the days of sailing without the prerequisite safety equipment aboard are long gone. I remember when survival suits came out. The resistance was immense — they were too bulky and most ...

Better Productivity Necessary for Fishery to Evolve

Last month I talked about quality, probably the biggest issue we face as an industry. This month, I will discuss productivity, another big issue that must be addressed, if we are going to have a better future. And, as we will see, the two issues are related. Productivity is measured as a ratio: Productivity = Output / Input In other words, it is simply a measure of how much of something we get out compared to what we put in. It is a way to measure effectiveness and efficiency in ...

Dressing For Success: Being Prepared for an Emergency

This information is intended for adults who work on the water. The guidelines for recreational activities and safety gear for children are different and we encourage you to contact our colleagues at Transport Canada, who were invaluable to us in preparing this column. Those who make a living on the water in Atlantic Canada deal with adverse weather conditions regularly. Strong winds, rough seas and cold temperatures often make up a typical day at work. When dangerous conditions are a ...

Adapting to Climate Change in Fisheries and Aquaculture

The United Nations recognizes climate change as one of the greatest challenges to global food security this century. Both terrestrial and aquatic environments are changing as a result of increased greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxides which result from the burning of fossil fuels and food production. The agriculture and fishing industries are contributors to GHG emissions around the world, however, the good news is that the impact is much less than ...

Quality is Biggest Issue Facing the Fishery Today

Of all the challenges we have in the capture fishery in Atlantic Canada — and there are many — probably none is bigger or more important to the future of the industry than the need to improve the quality of our raw materials and finished products. Quality is a foundation piece — it underpins everything else, determining what is possible in processing and marketing, our ultimate output value, the incomes earned by harvesters and plant workers and the profitability of plants and fishing ...

Georges Bank: A River Runs Through it

If you’re a Maritimer, it’s easy to get excited about a possible big oil strike off our shores. I well remember the hoopla over Sable Island discoveries in the 1970s and the then Premier Gerald Regan holding a small vial of oil to a group of media types in Halifax — the photo made front page in the daily newspapers of the time. There’s not a coastal community along our shores that hasn’t seen the population decline due to the lack of jobs here and the well-paying ones in the oil ...