Final Voyages 46 results

Survivor Extreme – Part III

On Wednesday, November 1, 1995, an 85-foot tug struck a rocky shoal about 10 miles south of Nain, Labrador. The Sea Alert sank within 10-12 minutes. The captain and two other crewmembers were lost with the vessel. The engineer, 30-year old Dave Barnes made it off the boat, but his journey to survival defies logic and some would say also defies medical science. This is the continuation of Survivor Extreme.   After two agonizing hours swimming and paddling a wooden crate-like raft ...

Survivor Extreme – Part II

On November 1, 1995, a tug with four men onboard, struck a rock in waters approximately 10 miles south of Nain, Labrador. Within a few minutes, the severely damaged Sea Alert sank. One man, engineer Dave Barnes, managed to get off the ship. His struggle to survive over the next 16 hours is almost incomprehensible. This is the continuation of Survivor Extreme.   When Dave ran from the engine room to the deck, he saw his three shipmates, Eph Skinner, Dave House and the tugboat’s ...

Survivor Extreme

Northern Labrador was a very busy place in 1995. The huge Voisey’s Bay nickel development was starting to swing into full gear in a remote part of the Labrador coastline just 21 miles south of Nain, the most northerly major town in Labrador. The early signs of winter are obvious in that region by late October with snow on the ground and ice forming along the coastline, while many ponds and lakes are often frozen solid. Marine shipping is crucial for the transport of nearly everything in ...

A Red Sky at Morning — Part II

(Above) John Gillett sitting on the deck of his house in Twillingate during an evening of story telling, 2014  On October 28, 1971, John Gillett and his friend Clarence Oxford were turr hunting when John had a sudden premonition of impending danger. His strange feeling was strong enough for John to suggest they should turn around and head for home in Twillingate. It was a calm morning and turrs were plentiful, but Clarence knew the forecast called for strong winds in the afternoon so ...

A Red Sky at Morning

Like most veteran fishing skippers, John Gillett has plenty of good yarns to spin about his many years on the water. Some are funny, some are about boats loaded to the gunwales, some are about bad years and others are about close calls — all are interesting. A few years ago, I had the opportunity one evening to sit and chat with John on the veranda of his home in Gillesport/Twillingate on the northeast coast of Newfoundland. Overlooking Twillingate Harbour while sipping a cup of tea ...

The End of a Dream – Part II

Last month we told you about Mackenzie’s Dream a 65-foot fishing vessel out of Bay de Verde, Newfoundland that caught fire nearly 200 kilometres offshore in May 2005. The crew was largely made up of one family. Captain Edwin Noonan was accompanied by his wife Anne, sons Shane and Edwin Jr (Neddy), daughter Melinda and Anne’s nephew Brendan Broderick. The only non-family member was Darin Rose. When flames in the ship’s stack began to spread to several areas of the vessel, it was time to ...

The End of a Dream

Above photo: Captain Ed Noonan at home in Bay de Verde Mackenzie’s Dream, a multi-species fishing vessel owned by Quinlan Brothers Ltd. of Bay de Verde on Newfoundland’s east coast, was one of the largest fishing vessels in the area in 2005. There were lots of other 65-footers in the Trinity and Conception Bay fleets, especially from Port de Grave, approximately 45 miles to the south, but Mackenzie’s Dream was 26-feet wide and higher than many vessels in her class and fitted ...

The Survival and Patience of Job – Part IV

Life for Job Goudie and his family would never be the same after the explosion that killed his friends Rollie Weir and Ralph King on Monday morning, May 29, 1978. Job barely survived, but there must have been times following when he wondered if survival was indeed a blessing. His struggle to live had only just begun when the Dobbin brothers pulled him from the ocean in Little Bay. For weeks, doctors could do little or nothing to fix his broken, fractured and mangled bones. Because his ...

The Survival and Patience of Job — Part III

On May 29, 1978, Ultramar fuel distributor Job Goudie from Springdale, Newfoundland was filling the gas tanks of a vessel in nearby Little Bay when an explosion occurred. The vessel owner, Rollie Weir, along with crewman, Ralph King, died in the inferno, but Job was blown overboard from the deck of the vessel and survived. He was badly burnt, with multiple bones broken along with many fractures, but thanks to the quick action of Bert and Leonard Dobbin from Little Bay, Job survived. This is ...

The Survival and Patience of Job — Part II

Above photo: Job’s boots were blown off his feet in the explosion but later recovered.  The force of the explosion separated half the boot from the soles in both. Last month we told you about an explosion and fire that killed two men from Little Bay Islands onboard a vessel. A third man miraculously survived. Job Goudie, from Springdale, was delivering gasoline to a small tanker vessel that was docked in Little Bay near Springdale, on Newfoundland’s northeast coast, when a fire, ...