Fisheries Forum 106 results

Death by 1,000 Cuts: The Rise and Fall of Little Bay Islands

The community of Little Bay Islands is situated in the mouth of Little Bay, in the part of Notre Dame Bay known as Green Bay. Green Bay is named because the hills are green with trees to the water’s edge. Little Bay Islands is made up of two islands, with a beautiful harbour with two narrow entrances, very sheltered from the winds and seas. In 1891, the population was 316, by 1935 it had grown to 560 and stayed around that figure until 1960, quite a population for that time. It was ...

Nova Scotia Fish Farms Global Leaders in Sustainability

It is an unfortunate reality that fish farming has been the subject of sustained misinformation campaigns in recent months. What makes this disturbing is that fish farming supports thousands of essential jobs in rural communities across Atlantic Canada — jobs that have become even more precious during these difficult economic times. For more than 40 years, Nova Scotians have supported marine fish farming and recognized that it can coexist with other fisheries on working waterfronts. T...

A Call for Patience and Empathy in a Fishery Dealing with COVID-19

This letter is in response to Gabe Gregory’s May 4 letter, Fish union’s delay tactics appalling. Contrary to Gregory’s assertions, fish-processing companies are not operating during the COVID-19 crisis under some noble sense of duty to the province or nation and they are certainly not sacrificing for the greater good. Fish processing companies are doing what they’ve always done — trying to maximize profit and impose greater control over the inshore fishery in this province. ...

Re-Examining DFO Basics

“If you always do what you’ve always done, you'll always get what you’ve always got.” An old trite saying perhaps, but still profoundly true. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) needs to seriously consider altering two of its long-held beliefs/practices in light of obvious changes in the ecosystem and failed attempts to produce a recovery of our cod stocks. We do not need to go back and revisit the failures of the past. There are enough current examples of continued ...

A Fisherman’s Daughter’s Perspective

I am a fisherman’s daughter who is very aware of the beauty and the dangers of the ocean. Fishing isn’t for everyone — it is a physical, dangerous, high risk profession in which generations of fishers have gone out on the water and, all too often, not come home. The fishery is one of Newfoundland and Labrador’s many highly dependent resource sectors employing thousands of people directly and indirectly. This year, the obstacles facing this sector are beyond what any industry ...

Should There be a Fishery in Newfoundland and Labrador This Year?

The fishery is part of the food chain, the very essence of life. We have a lot of people in this world who are starving to death and any interruptions in the food chain will only make things worse. Food gets scarce, prices skyrocket and the poor people will be the ones to suffer. There is a lot of fear in this province and you hear it every day on radio and TV, all in an effort to get people to stay home. Approximately 90 per cent of food in Newfoundland and Labrador comes from outside ...

Supporting the Essential Service Employees Who are Supporting the World

Above: Lonnie Snow photo With the COVID-19 pandemic, the entire world has entered an unprecedented situation. It is difficult to recall a time in living memory where so much of the world has been at a standstill and yet some industries — and some people — find themselves busier than ever, shouldering the weight of our emergency response as they keep essential services functioning. The Canadian fish and seafood sector is one of these essential services. Harvesters, processors ...

Nova Scotia is the Gold Standard for Aquaculture

Recently there’s been a lot of talk about aquaculture and Nova Scotians deserve to have their questions answered. But without the facts, we can’t have an honest conversation. Recent information circulating about the aquaculture industry is inaccurate and fails to recognize it for the safe, sustainable, growth-oriented industry that it is. For more than 40 years, Nova Scotians have supported marine fish farming and recognized that it can co-exist with other fisheries on working ...

Fisheries Management Suffering from Recurring Issues

Our current approach to fishery management results in some crucial and recurring problems that are currently highlighted by three particular issues. One is the controversy over the latest 3PS cod stock assessment and the new computer model being used there. Despite the continuing discussion and whatever the pros and cons of the two approaches, no change in the assessment method can change the amount of fish in the ocean. Moreover, there appears to be no clear idea of how the results will ...

Seals, Seals Everywhere

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has a responsibility to protect and manage the common fish resource in Canada. So far, in my opinion, the only things it has managed are the fish harvesters because you can’t manage fish unless you manage the predators of fish. DFO has not managed predators like seals and here we are with our fish resources in crisis. We have between 12 to 15 million seals and the fish total allowable catches (TACs) are just not enough to have a prosperous ...