Safety 35 results

The End of a Dream – Part II

Last month we told you about Mackenzie’s Dream a 65-foot fishing vessel out of Bay de Verde, Newfoundland that caught fire nearly 200 kilometres offshore in May 2005. The crew was largely made up of one family. Captain Edwin Noonan was accompanied by his wife Anne, sons Shane and Edwin Jr (Neddy), daughter Melinda and Anne’s nephew Brendan Broderick. The only non-family member was Darin Rose. When flames in the ship’s stack began to spread to several areas of the vessel, it was time to ...

2018: A Below Average Year for Ice

After experiencing several recent hard springs battling heavy ice, it looks like most fishermen will be catching a break this year. At a recent technical briefing in St. John’s, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) reported that ice conditions are far more favourable than in the last years — when heavy ice delayed fishing seasons and damaged valuable vessels and gear. Trevor Hodgson, CCG icebreaking superintendent for the Atlantic region said while ice conditions were heavy last year in ...

Navigate Safely: Keep Water Out of Service Tanks

Over the last few years, we have seen significant changes take place in the marine industry. Increased traffic, variation in fuel prices and emerging technologies have all impacted the way we navigate our waterways. What hasn’t changed is the need to navigate safely, which remains a top of mind priority. Recent Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) investigations have highlighted a safety issue with respect to engine room practices aboard ships, more specifically regarding fuel ...

Safety at Sea Improving for N.S. Fishing Industry

Above photo: Miss Ally leaving West Head on February 12, 2013. Photo courtesy of Della Sears Newell The adoption and implementation of safe fishing practices in the Nova Scotia fishing industry is paying off in terms of lives saved, less injuries and the lowest Worker’s Compensation rates in 20 years. “Since 2016, the fishing industry has saved $7.5 million in premiums” for Worker’s Compensation, said Amanda Dedrick executive director of the Nova Scotia Fisheries Safety ...

Risky Business

The May issue of The Navigator each year is about marine safety. Consistent with that theme, this column is about the risks associated with catching fish. And there is no doubt fishing is a risky business. Wikipedia provides a couple of interesting definitions of risk. One is “the potential for gaining or losing something of value.” And the other is “the intentional interaction with uncertainty.” Both seem to be relevant for thinking about risk in the fishery. Although there ...

Emergency Ready

“Does anyone know where the love of God goes, when the waves turn the minutes to hours?” This poignant line from the Gordon Lightfoot song Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, sums up the reason that Canadian Coast Guard and Search and Rescue personnel go to work every day. On the east coast of Canada, from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, to the rugged coast of Labrador, to the tidal waters of the Bay of Fundy and throughout the Gulf of St. Lawrence, these men and women have provided ...

Gangways: Simple Safety

The topic of gangways causes me to reflect over the past 30 years, and for that matter all my life, of all the time I have spent on and around wharves and boats and how often I have risked my life trying to get aboard a vessel. Everyone involved in the marine industry can relate to this topic and can visualize what I am talking about. Boarding a vessel is always a risk, particularly smaller vessels in the 35’ to 65’ category. The boat is rarely perfectly positioned to enable easy access ...

EPIRBs Should be Essential Equipment Aboard Fishing Vessels

Time is of the essence when a person goes overboard and a vessel or fisherman carrying an EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon), which has been registered with the rescue coordination centre in Halifax, could mean the difference between life and death. This was clearly shown on Nov. 30, 2015, 23 nautical miles from Clark’s Harbour, Nova Scotia. On that date, a crewman aboard the Cock-a-Wit Lady fell overboard. This was dumping day for the LFA 34 lobster fishery, with ...

Safety – Everybody’s Job

Safety in the fishing industry is different than in other industries. Statistically, fishing is still the most dangerous occupation in the country outside the military and policing. We lose, on average, nearly a dozen fishermen every year. That high number is due in part to the fact that some accidents at sea cause multiple deaths, especially in these days of larger boats. While no two fatal accidents are alike in the inshore fishing industry, there are often similarities. I once wrote ...

Safe Work Practices a Must, According to Transportation Safety Board

A lot of ship-board accidents, including people falling overboard, could be prevented if safe work practices were in force. According to the Transportation Safety Board (TSB), regulations place the responsibility on the authorized representative to develop procedures for the safe operation of the vessel. “The resulting safe work practices help ensure that masters and crew members have the knowledge, as well as the necessary information to make sound decisions in any operating conditio...