Safety 62 results

25 Seconds: The M/V Flare

It was only 25 seconds of time, but it will stay with Ann-Margret White forever. White is 49 years old and from Corner Brook. She graduated University with a double degree in French and German. She started her career teaching high school French, waiting for full time employment, when her mother saw an ad in a local newspaper. “This might be a job for you,” her mother said, “it’s a radio operator with Coast Guard and you need Grade 12 and French.” Today she’s the Regional ...

Improving Maintenance, Improves Safety

Safety first is a term you hear often, but is not always practiced. Although most vessel owners have safety at the forefront of their thoughts when operating their vessel, “there is always room for improvement,” as the saying goes. One way to improve safety is to practice good preventative maintenance, to ensure your vessel is well-prepared for the season or the trip ahead. There is often reluctance to invest into maintenance when there may not be any apparent reason to spend the ...

Training with the Canadian Coast Guard

Photos courtesy of Combat Camera and Canadian Coast Guard.

Water Still Muddy on Sub-Centre Issue: Government Considering Options for St. John’s Role in Search and Rescue Co-ordination

It appeared to be full steam ahead for those onboard when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s mandate letter last fall to Fisheries and Oceans Minister Hunter Tootoo directed him, as a priority, to re-open the maritime rescue sub-centre in St. John’s and the Kitsilano Coast Guard Base in Vancouver. It was a follow-up on a campaign promise prior to the last federal election to reverse a decision by the previous Conservative government to close those facilities. But while the engines have ...

Three Pillars of Amendments to Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations

Transport Canada is in the process of amending the Small Vessel Inspection Regulations in an effort to stymie the number of accidents on fishing vessels, which resulted into 16 deaths three years ago, making the commercial fishery the most dangerous occupation in Canada. The department has three objectives in mind to achieve this end: safe operating procedures, safety equipment and stability requirements. Safe Operating Procedures New provisions would require all small fishing vessels to ...

Safety Improvements Coming to Industry

These are sobering figures. Between 2009 and 2013, 40 per cent of all marine accidents in Canada were pinned to fishing vessels, approximately 134 vessels per year. Three years ago, 16 fishing fatalities were reported, many of the vessels fishing from south west Nova Scotia ports like Woods Harbour-Forbes Point. Sailing in weather conditions not suited to small boats, a vessel stability problem and the lack of adequate safety equipment or training for vessel crews were all deemed ...

Boys Oh Buoys

Outside the window of a red brick building, adjacent to St. John’s harbour, sits a colourful assortment of large, metal objects. Some of these objects are painted bright primary colours and others are encrusted in rust and barnacles. They are aids to navigation best known as buoys and no matter if you pronounce it “BOO-ee”, “bwoy” or “BOY” these brightly coloured pieces of metal are crucial to mariners. Dan Pike, superintendent of maritime and civil infrastructure (MCI) with ...

Not Your Average Summer Job: The Canadian Coast Guard’s Inshore Rescue Boat Program

Every summer thousands of university and college students across Canada take summer jobs to get experience to help in their future careers. Many of these jobs are in the retail and service industry, or working in an office or commercial setting. But for students with a sense of adventure, a love of the outdoors, and a desire to help people, the Canadian Coast Guard has a unique summer employment opportunity. If you are on the water during the summer you might have seen them, they are the ...

Working Together to Protect the Ocean From Marine Pollution

All Canadians, particularly those who work on the water or live along our coasts, know that healthy oceans and shorelines are important to the economic, physical, and cultural well being of our country. Activities such as fishing, oil and gas exploration and development, transportation of cargo, tourism, and recreation are essential to our daily activities and livelihoods, but make the ocean a busy place. With all this marine activity, it is important that everyone takes responsibility for ...

New Plan Unveiled to Improve Fishing Safety

Fishermen, industry and government released a plan today, June 4, in Eastern Passage, aimed at making Nova Scotia's commercial fishing industry safer. Fishing Safety Now is a plan by and for Nova Scotia's fishing industry. Developed by the Safe at Sea Alliance – a group of fishermen, family members, industry, safety organizations, community leaders, and government – the plan includes several recommendations to help improve safety. Recommendations include the development of a safety ...