canadian centre for fisheries innovation 32 results

25 Years After the Moratorium

July 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of the announcement of the moratorium on fishing Northern cod off the northeast coast of Newfoundland and Labrador, in NAFO Divisions 2J3KL. It is worth noting that 1992 was just 15 years after Canada obtained a 200-mile exclusive economic zone, with widespread expectations that we could increase our fish catches substantially but resources would still increase in abundance over time, due to good Canadian management. However, the 1992 moratorium was ...

Living on the Edge

According to the Collins English Dictionary, “living on the edge” means “taking a risk above and beyond what most people would do, pushing your horizons, be it physical, mental or otherwise.” It goes on to say that “This is a common trait among daredevils and over-the-top sports enthusiasts.” The dictionary might also have said it is a common trait among those daredevils who work in the fishery in Atlantic Canada. Other than fish, risk is probably the dominant characteris...

Serving Customers

In the fishery in Atlantic Canada, there is a widespread belief among harvesters that they are the most important people in the seafood value chain, because they catch fish for others to process and eat. Without them, there would be no fish. Although there is a certain logic to it, that view of the world is completely upside down. In any value chain — seafood or other — the most important person is the one at the end of the chain — the consumer — who buys the product, pays for it, ...

Shaping the World We Live in

The beginning of a new year seems to be a good time to think about what the future will bring. Little did we think at the beginning of 2016 that now, just a year later, Donald Trump would be President of the United States, Britain would vote to leave the European Union, or the very existence of the EU would be under threat just as Canada is about to finalize a free-trade agreement with it. Life seems to be full of surprises. But should they really be surprises? Over Christmas, I read a ...

Learning from 40 Years with the 200-Mile Limit – Part II

Last month’s column dealt mainly with how Canada obtained the 200-mile limit in 1977, leading to great optimism about the future of the fishery in Atlantic Canada, but things did not turn out as expected. Starting in 1992, just 15 years later, we imposed a series of moratoriums on fishing groundfish stocks to try to conserve what was left of those resources. However, things were not going well even before the moratoriums. In 1981, there was a Royal Commission to investigate problems in ...

Learning from 40 Years with the 200-Mile Limit – Part I

As we approach 2017, we are also coming to the end of 40 years since Canada’s 200-mile limit came into effect in 1977. Overall, it has been a tumultuous — and costly — 40 years, as we oscillated between tremendous opportunity and unmitigated disaster. Forty years ago, we thought the 200-mile limit offered a huge opportunity. But the following 15 years brought little but trouble, culminating in a series of moratoriums on fishing the groundfish stocks that had been the industry’s ...

Creating New Competitive Advantages

Last month, I demonstrated that the competitive advantages that have sustained the fishing industry in Atlantic Canada for a long time are no longer advantages for us. Our once-abundant resources are no longer as abundant as they were, and others we compete with have similar resources in greater abundance. Because of free-trade agreements and globalization of supply chains, we have access to good markets on favourable terms — but others have access to the same markets on similar terms, so ...

Key Performance Indicators

Most businesses use a few key performance indicators (KPIs) to assess how well they are doing in meeting important objectives. In previous columns, I have discussed the fact that we have a serious productivity problem in the capture fishery in Atlantic Canada. Productivity is a good example of a key performance indicator, but there are others. For example, an important KPI for the Icelandic fishing industry is output value per kilogram of catch. The industry in Iceland selected it as a ...

Achieving Extraordinary Results

Last month, I talked about the productivity problem we have in our industry and illustrated how that translates into low incomes for industry participants. Specifically, I showed how output value per person employed is very low compared with the fishing industry in Iceland and the food industry in Canada, among others. If people in our industry want to have better incomes, we have to improve our productivity and that will require change — innovation, in other words. A recent report ...

Productivity and Incomes

Atlantic Canada’s capture fishing industry has had a serious productivity problem for a long time. I wrote a column about that fact a little over a year ago. This month, I will discuss the significance of the problem in determining incomes of people in the industry and the challenges it will present for the industry of the future. First, I should remind readers that productivity is measured as a ratio: It is a measure of how much of something we get out compared to what we put ...