ccfi 68 results

Serving Customers – Part II

Last month, my column was about the array of cod products — and products of some other species often substituted for cod – available for different prices at retail stores in St. John’s, N.L. Stores in larger cities undoubtedly offer an even broader range of fish products and prices. And, of course, fish competes with other protein foods, such as beef, pork and poultry. Given the array of choices offered to them, I asked, how do consumers decide which products to buy, take home and ...

Serving Customers

In the fishery in Atlantic Canada, there is a widespread belief among harvesters that they are the most important people in the seafood value chain, because they catch fish for others to process and eat. Without them, there would be no fish. Although there is a certain logic to it, that view of the world is completely upside down. In any value chain — seafood or other — the most important person is the one at the end of the chain — the consumer — who buys the product, pays for it, ...

Shaping the World We Live in

The beginning of a new year seems to be a good time to think about what the future will bring. Little did we think at the beginning of 2016 that now, just a year later, Donald Trump would be President of the United States, Britain would vote to leave the European Union, or the very existence of the EU would be under threat just as Canada is about to finalize a free-trade agreement with it. Life seems to be full of surprises. But should they really be surprises? Over Christmas, I read a ...

Learning from 40 Years with the 200-Mile Limit – Part II

Last month’s column dealt mainly with how Canada obtained the 200-mile limit in 1977, leading to great optimism about the future of the fishery in Atlantic Canada, but things did not turn out as expected. Starting in 1992, just 15 years later, we imposed a series of moratoriums on fishing groundfish stocks to try to conserve what was left of those resources. However, things were not going well even before the moratoriums. In 1981, there was a Royal Commission to investigate problems in ...

Learning from 40 Years with the 200-Mile Limit – Part I

As we approach 2017, we are also coming to the end of 40 years since Canada’s 200-mile limit came into effect in 1977. Overall, it has been a tumultuous — and costly — 40 years, as we oscillated between tremendous opportunity and unmitigated disaster. Forty years ago, we thought the 200-mile limit offered a huge opportunity. But the following 15 years brought little but trouble, culminating in a series of moratoriums on fishing the groundfish stocks that had been the industry’s ...

Creating New Competitive Advantages

Last month, I demonstrated that the competitive advantages that have sustained the fishing industry in Atlantic Canada for a long time are no longer advantages for us. Our once-abundant resources are no longer as abundant as they were, and others we compete with have similar resources in greater abundance. Because of free-trade agreements and globalization of supply chains, we have access to good markets on favourable terms — but others have access to the same markets on similar terms, so ...

Improving Industry Performance

Last month’s column discussed the fact that our industry’s performance is weak and seemingly getting worse, when measured against four key performance indicators — competitiveness in international markets, industry profitability, resource sustainability, and providing jobs and incomes. In this column, I will talk about what we need to do to improve the industry’s performance. So what can we do to improve? To answer that question, it helps to learn some lessons from our history. ...

Key Performance Indicators

Most businesses use a few key performance indicators (KPIs) to assess how well they are doing in meeting important objectives. In previous columns, I have discussed the fact that we have a serious productivity problem in the capture fishery in Atlantic Canada. Productivity is a good example of a key performance indicator, but there are others. For example, an important KPI for the Icelandic fishing industry is output value per kilogram of catch. The industry in Iceland selected it as a ...

Brexit, Trump, Future Shock and the Fishing Industry

This column will be unlike any other I have written or probably will ever write for The Navigator magazine. But recent events represent a significant departure from those of the past few decades and I think it is worthwhile to reflect on how they relate to the fishery. On June 23, citizens of the United Kingdom voted to withdraw from the European Union. As I write this, Donald Trump has emerged as the presumptive Republican candidate for President of the United States. And through most of ...

Achieving Extraordinary Results

Last month, I talked about the productivity problem we have in our industry and illustrated how that translates into low incomes for industry participants. Specifically, I showed how output value per person employed is very low compared with the fishing industry in Iceland and the food industry in Canada, among others. If people in our industry want to have better incomes, we have to improve our productivity and that will require change — innovation, in other words. A recent report ...