colin maclean 41 results

Signs Point to Positive: Harvesters Hopeful for Strong Spring Lobster Fishery in P.E.I.

By mid-April 2015 some Prince Edward Island fishermen were so anxious about the unusual ice conditions in their harbours that many grabbed their chainsaws and started trying to clear up the blockages themselves. In the end, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) decided to delay the spring lobster season from its usual April 30 start date in the hopes that the ice would clear out naturally. The season officially opened several days later and was extended at the tail end of the season ...

Salt of the Island Sea: P.E.I. Company Hoping to Turn Artisanal Salt Into Burgeoning Industry

From the original Mi’kmaq First Nation inhabitants, to the French and British Empire colonists and their descendants, the people of Prince Edward Island have always relied on the sea to provide for their families. Over the years, Islanders have found new and ingenious ways of reaping the bounty of the ocean. Now one Charlottetown company is looking to the sea itself to apply some of that same old fashioned ingenuity. The Prince Edward Island Sea Salt Co. is a new venture by an ...

Work Rewarded: Roger Sark Honoured by Atlantic First Nations Chiefs for Fisheries Work

Roger Sark received a surprising phone call recently. He was informed that he was to be honoured by the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nations Chiefs as the 2015 Fisheries Business Person of the Year. It's not something he was expecting, but it’s welcome all the same, Sark said. “I was thrilled,” he said. “It's always great to be recognized for the work you do amongst your peers in the industry. I was quite happy.” “It was a learning process for me, every step ...

Back in Business in Brudenell: Mothballed Lobster Plant Given Renewed Life Under New Owners

There is growing excitement in eastern Prince Edward Island regarding the fate of a shuttered fish processing plant. The facility is in the community of Brudenell and was formerly operated by Mariner Seafoods. At its peak, it employed more than 300 people processing fish and at one point vegetables. But the global recession hit the facility hard and its owners did not renew their lease in 2013. However, a new owner has taken the facility under its wing and is gearing up to reopen in ...

A Call to Action: P.E.I. Groups Join National Call to Improve Rights for Temporary Foreign Workers

The thought of being legally tied to an employer is borderline laughable for the average Canadian. Citizens and residents of Canada are free to quit and take jobs as easily as switching hats — if they can get them. But not everyone living in our society is so fortunate. People working in this country under the federal temporary foreign worker program, and its various sub-programs, are largely tied to the employer to whom they are hired and approved to work for under the program. If, ...

P.E.I., Home of the Frankenfish: World’s First Genetically Modified Animal Approved for Human Consumption Starts Life Here

On Nov. 19, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved a company called AquaBounty to sell its genetically modified Atlantic salmon in America. The company has also applied to sell its product in Canada. Those fish, the first of their kind approved for commercial production anywhere in the world, start their lives on Prince Edward Island. But many Islanders don’t consider that particular distinction to be something to be proud of. Local environmental groups, and other ...

Port in Storm: Souris Harbour Authority Fighting to Keep Small Town Economy Afloat

Hugging itself to the red sandstone cliffs near the eastern point of Prince Edward Island's crescent profile, the community of Souris has ever been tied to the sea. First settled by Europeans in the early 1700s, farming, fishing and their associated industries have been the major employers of Souris' people ever since. But like so many other small communities in Atlantic Canada, this one has had to learn quickly how to survive in a world that seems to change faster every year. The most ...

Building an Industry: P.E.I.’s Only Halibut Farm Continues to Grow

Leaning over the tank full of water in front of him, Bob Johnson pushed open a mesh screen so his visitor could get a look at the creatures lurking inside. Readily distinguishable from the light blue tanks they swam in, hundreds of flat, dark, outlines hugged the bottom as though their lives depended on it — each about the size of an open human palm. Despite their love of the bottom of the tank, a couple of the small fish break away, head for the surface and swim leisurely there for a ...

Unexpected Lobster Feed: P.E.I. Conference Centre Serves Up Tasty Surprise For Local Soup Kitchen

Mike MacDonald was doing some work around the Upper Room Soup Kitchen in Charlottetown recently when he got a phone call he never imagined he’d get. On the other end of the phone line was Javier Alarco, executive chef of the Delta Prince Edward, one of the busiest hotels on Prince Edward Island. As it turns out, Alarco had a problem, one that MacDonald was only too happy to help with. The chef had 200 cooked lobsters sitting in his fridge and he was looking for a new home for them. ...

Small Fry, Big Fish: P.E.I. 10-Year-Old Lands 480-Pound Bluefin Tuna

Little did 10-year-old Koen Norton know that when he set out on his father’s vessel he was going to come home with a monster. But he’d certainly hoped. Koen, from the Montague area of Prince Edward Island, recently made headlines all over the world when he obliterated a world record for largest bluefin tuna caught by someone in his age category. The records are kept by the International Game Fish Association. Koen landed, by himself, a 486-pound bluefin off Naufrage Harbour. He was ...