safety 89 results

The Saga of Recommendation M16-05

On September 5, 2015, the fishing vessel Caledonian capsized 20 nautical miles west of Nootka Sound, British Columbia. At the time, the vessel was trawling for hake with four crew members onboard. Following the capsizing, the master and mate climbed onto the overturned hull and remained there for several hours. When the vessel eventually sank, the master and mate abandoned it and the mate swam toward and boarded the life raft. The Canadian Coast Guard subsequently rescued the mate and ...

Additional PFD Options on the Horizon

Industry Input Being Sought Through Online Survey New harmonized standards for personal flotation devices (PFDs), lifejackets and lifejacket components, and throwable lifesaving devices means more options of personal lifesaving appliances are on the horizon for the fishing industry. “We do know there are changes being made right now. Some of them are good changes that some folks in the fishing industry will like, but not all the changes we want to see… we get a lot of verbal PFD ...

Risk = Probability x Impact

Safety is the theme for this month’s issue of The Navigator. But safety is a concern because of risk. The fishery is widely regarded as being the riskiest occupation in the world. The risks have even been the subject of reality television shows, such as Deadliest Catch, about the crab fishery in Alaska. When the risks in your industry are offered to the public as a form of entertainment, to provide a vicarious thrill, it is not a good sign. Risk can be assessed based on the simple ...

Providing No More – Part II

On February 6, 2018, the fishing vessel Fisherman’s Provider II left port in Canso, Nova Scotia on a five-day halibut fishing trip. After nearly two hours of erratic steaming behavior, including going around in circles just off Canso, the vessel ran hard aground on a well-known shoal. At first, the skipper and three crewmembers had plenty of time to comfortably get off the vessel, but the captain, Roger Stoddard, was apparently not about to leave his vessel under any circumstances. This is ...

Risks and Risk Management

Fishing vessels are places of work. But they present safety hazards unlike those of most other places of work. They are on water, rather than land and can be a considerable distance from land or other potential sources of shelter or assistance, should they be needed. Vessels react to atmospheric and ocean conditions, moving in different directions as they pitch, roll and yaw. Space on a vessel is expensive, limited and usually well-utilized, often requiring people to live and work in ...

Fishing Safety Highlighted at First Annual FSANS Awards

Above: Captain Keith Colburn (standing left) and safety advisor for the FSANS, Matthew Duffy, pose with Ken Lukas (front row from left), Barbara Duffy, Lorraine MacLean, Darrell MacLean, John Calder and Kim Calder at the Splashes of Safety awards banquet in Halifax on Sept. 28. Contributed photo Safety excellence in the Nova Scotia fishing industry was celebrated at the first annual Splashes of Safety awards dinner and fundraiser on Sept. 28 at the Westin Nova Scotian Hotel in Halifax....

Survivor Extreme – Part II

On November 1, 1995, a tug with four men onboard, struck a rock in waters approximately 10 miles south of Nain, Labrador. Within a few minutes, the severely damaged Sea Alert sank. One man, engineer Dave Barnes, managed to get off the ship. His struggle to survive over the next 16 hours is almost incomprehensible. This is the continuation of Survivor Extreme.   When Dave ran from the engine room to the deck, he saw his three shipmates, Eph Skinner, Dave House and the tugboat’s ...

Building a Better Future – Part II

Last month we told you about a remarkable fisherman from Cheticamp, Nova Scotia. Leonard LeBlanc has worked tirelessly to make the fishing industry as progressive as possible. Leonard has retired from the fishing boat now but his work with various associations continues. Improving safety in the fishing industry has been a large part of Leonard’s raison d'être for a long time. An accident that claimed the life of his young son had a lot to do with that role. This is Part II of Building a ...

Emergency Ready

“Does anyone know where the love of God goes, when the waves turn the minutes to hours?” This poignant line from the Gordon Lightfoot song Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, sums up the reason that Canadian Coast Guard and Search and Rescue personnel go to work every day. On the east coast of Canada, from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, to the rugged coast of Labrador, to the tidal waters of the Bay of Fundy and throughout the Gulf of St. Lawrence, these men and women have provided ...

Gangways: Simple Safety

The topic of gangways causes me to reflect over the past 30 years, and for that matter all my life, of all the time I have spent on and around wharves and boats and how often I have risked my life trying to get aboard a vessel. Everyone involved in the marine industry can relate to this topic and can visualize what I am talking about. Boarding a vessel is always a risk, particularly smaller vessels in the 35’ to 65’ category. The boat is rarely perfectly positioned to enable easy access ...