safety 98 results

TSB Watchlist Calls on the Canadian Marine Transportation Industry to Take Action

Advancing transportation safety in Canada can often be a slow and arduous process. But at the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB), we are convinced that if we continue to press for change — lives can, and will, be saved. That’s why the TSB works diligently to increase the uptake of the recommendations we make to regulators and industry. Through our investigations, we make compelling arguments to make improvements to safety that will save lives, protect transportation infrastruc...

Safety Must Evolve With the Fishery

The fishery has never been more popular in the mainstream media. Several television shows, highlighting various segments of the fishing industry, are attracting millions of viewers each week. Network executives and producers have caught on that the fishing industry makes for good reality television — it has everything viewers are looking for; stunning backdrops, interesting and memorable characters, excitement and suspense, sprinkled with a touch of danger. For the couch-sitting, ...

Coast Guard Reopens Seasonal SAR Bases

Now that spring is here, the Canadian Coast Guard would like to inform the public that its seasonal search and rescue bases in Quebec City, Tadoussac, Kegaska, Rivière-au-Renard, Havre-Saint-Pierre and Cap-aux-Meules are open. The Canadian Coast Guard’s seasonal bases are strategically located to provide rapid assistance and reduce the number and severity of maritime incidents and risks to the environment. The bases are open from April to November. The Canadian Coast Guard reminds the ...

Abandon Ship: Tips on Surviving in Cold Water

In our previous articles we’ve discussed some of the things you can do if you find yourself in an emergency situation on the water. Let’s say you’ve done everything right so far: you’ve told someone your voyage plan before you left dock; registered and triggered your Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB); shot off a flare; called in a Mayday giving your location, the number of people on board and the nature of the emergency and put on your safety gear, providing both ...

Safety Culture Catching on in Nova Scotia Fishery

Various governmental agencies in Nova Scotia have been pushing the safety at sea issue for fishermen for quite some time — and their efforts seem to be paying off, in a big way. While the commercial fishery remains the most dangerous occupation in Canada and each year claims far too many lives and limbs, the days of sailing without the prerequisite safety equipment aboard are long gone. I remember when survival suits came out. The resistance was immense — they were too bulky and most ...

Dressing For Success: Being Prepared for an Emergency

This information is intended for adults who work on the water. The guidelines for recreational activities and safety gear for children are different and we encourage you to contact our colleagues at Transport Canada, who were invaluable to us in preparing this column. Those who make a living on the water in Atlantic Canada deal with adverse weather conditions regularly. Strong winds, rough seas and cold temperatures often make up a typical day at work. When dangerous conditions are a ...

Fishing Fatalities Continue to be Major Concern For TSB

The high number of accidents involving loss of life on fishing vessels remains one of the key priorities for the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB). Commercial fishing industry fatalities was one of eight significant safety issues identified by the TSB in its 2014 Watchlist — released in late November of last year. According to the TSB Watchlist, an average of 134 fishing vessel accidents per year were reported between 2009 and 2013 in Canada, which together comprised 40 per ...

Distress Flares: The Low-Tech, Last-Ditch Option That Might Just Save You

With the arsenal of distress signaling options available to mariners now, there are a lot of things that have to malfunction before you’ll find yourself rummaging for flares in your emergency kit. But should the unfortunate situation arise where flares are all you’ve got, here are a few important things to keep in mind. All distress signaling devices have pros and cons. Flares may be a ‘last-ditch’ choice, but if used correctly, parachute flares can be seen upwards of 40 miles ...